Great Staff

Too often I hear the lament of not enough good or great staff.

Great Staff?

  • Do you find good staff?
  • Do they find you?
  • Do you grow them?

Yes, yes, yes.

Having great staff is not just a case of having great people.
Even the greatest people won’t be great staff if you don’t do the right things as an employer.

Great people are what you receive. Great staff are what you create.

What are some of the steps that need to happen?

Recruitment…
Be bold, be enthusiastic. Interview four unequal candidates – the best of those that show specific but quite different attributes. Why split hairs on the middle ground, make the differences obvious ones that count. Seek talent. A colleague of mine utilises sociology, anthropology and psychology in his recommendations as a talent consultant. This not only improves the fit but provides a great framework going forward.

In the beginning…
Pour in the resources. Keep the channels open, ensure peers, colleagues and superiors are engaging with the new hire. Ensure they have the resources they need and know how to access them. Make them feel welcome, not as though they have to justify their existence in a foreign country. Don’t spend $20-$50,000 on recruitment and nothing on the follow through.

Along the way…

  • Gather evidence; check with staff and clients how they observe the new staff member.
  • Keep the dialogue alive.
  • Don’t settle for less than they can deliver.
  • Reset goals, set stretch targets. Demonstrate belief and interest in their development.
  • Be authentic.

At all stages…

Keep the momentum, build excitement, and make it viral.

And now…

Do the same for all your staff.

Every day you are re-recruiting your own staff, except they are interviewing you, assessing their options, deciding their future.

Build on these guidelines and they will find you, you will find them, and they will grow with you.

2 Replies to “Great Staff”

  1. Jack Welch is famous for saying, “Passion Sings, money talks”. Of course he was referring to acquisition. The same holds true across the retain and develop score card. From day one induction, through to the final, hopefully mutual parting of the ways the ROTE (Return on Talent Employed) delivererd all comes down to how well an organization’s leaders have grown, nurtured, developed and promoted their organizational talent.

    Organizations are starting to grapple with getting human capital investment on the balance sheet. Not before time!

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